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East of England


Aldeburgh
A prosperous port in the 16th century, now famous for the Aldeburgh Music Festival held annually in June. The 16th century Moot Hall, now a museum, is a timber-framed building once used as an open market.

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Alresford
Village easily accessible from the Essex Sunshine Coast and Colchester.

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Beccles
Fire destroyed the town in the 16th century and it was rebuilt in Georgian red brick. The River Waveney, on which the town stands, is popular with boating enthusiasts and has an annual regatta. Home of Beccles and District Museum.

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Berkhamsted
Hilltop town on Grand Union Canal surrounded by pleasant countryside and a 1200-acre common. It has remains of an important castle with earthworks and moat. Birthplace of William Cowper, the poet.

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Billericay
Site of both Roman and Saxon settlements and a popular overnight stop for Canterbury pilgrims. Historic links with famous Mayflower voyage. Now a flourishing town with a wide variety of sports, leisure and cultural activities and some fine examples of Georgian architecture.

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Blakeney
Picturesque village on the north coast of Norfolk and a former port and fishing village. 15th century Guildhall. Marshy creeks extend towards Blakeney Point (National Trust) and are a paradise for naturalists, with trips to the reserve and to see the seals from Blakeney Quay.

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Brancaster
On the North Norfolk coast. One mile from the pebble beach. Close to Holkham Hall and Sandringham. Many nature reserves nearby.

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Brancaster Staithe
Small harbour with a boat service to Scolt Head Island, a bird sanctuary and nature-study area.

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Cambridge
A most important and beautiful city on the River Cam with 31 colleges forming one of the oldest universities in the world. Numerous museums, good shopping centre, restaurants, theatres, cinema and fine bookshops.

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Castle Hedingham
Here is a splendid Norman keep, built by the famous deVeres, Earls of Oxford, with the finest Norman arch in England, all beside a medieval village with a fine Norman church.

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Chelmsford
The county town of Essex, originally a Roman settlement, Caesaromagus, thought to have been destroyed by Boudicca. Growth of the town's industry can be traced in the excellent museum in Oaklands Park. The 15th century parish church has been Chelmsford Cathedral since 1914.

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Cley Next The Sea
Due to land reclamation, the village has not been 'next the sea' since the 17th century. Behind the old quay the main street winds between flint-built houses. The marshes between Cley and Salthouse are bird reserves. Cley Windmill is a 160-year-old tower mill converted into a guesthouse.

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Colchester
Britain's oldest-recorded town standing on the River Colne and famous for its oysters. Numerous historic buildings, ancient remains and museums. Plenty of parks and gardens, extensive shopping centre, theatre and zoo.

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Cromer
Once a small fishing village and now famous for its fishing boats that still work off the beach and offer freshly caught crabs. Excellent bathing on sandy beaches fringed by cliffs. The town boasts a fine pier, theatre, museum and a lifeboat station.

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Dedham
A former wool town. Dedham Vale is an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, and there is a countryside centre in the village. This is John Constable country, and Sir Alfred Munnings lived at Castle House which is open to the public.

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Docking
Conservation village still retaining village stocks, lock-up, blacksmith's forge and ponds. Well situated for the North Norfolk coast 5 miles away.

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East Bergholt
John Constable, the famous East Anglian artist, was born here in 1776 and at the church of St Mary are reminders of his family's associations with the area. One mile south of the village are Flatford Mill and Willy Lott's cottage, both made famous by Constable in his paintings.

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East Harling
In the heart of Norfolk countryside, near Thetford forest.

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Ely
Until the 17th century, when the Fens were drained, Ely was an island. The cathedral, completed in 1189, dominates the surrounding area. One particular feature is the central octagonal tower with a fan-vaulted timber roof and wooden lantern.

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Eye
"Eye" means island, and this town was once surrounded by marsh. The fine church of SS Peter and Paul has a tower over 100 feet high. A carving of the Archangel Gabriel can be seen on the 16th century Guildhall.

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Fakenham
Attractive, small market town which dates from Saxon times and was a Royal Manor until the 17th century. Its market place has 2 old coaching inns, both showing traces of earlier work behind Georgian facades, and the parish church has a commanding 15th century tower.

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Felixstowe
Seaside resort that developed at the end of the 19th century, lying in a gently curving bay with a 2-mile-long beach and backed by a wide promenade of lawns and floral gardens.

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Foxley
Small, quiet, rural village close to Fakenham and East Dereham.

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Gresham
A rural village with a round-towered church which has a fine Seven Sacraments font.

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Haughley
In the heart of Suffolk, very well placed for touring.

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Heacham
The portrait of a Red Indian princess who married John Rolfe of Heacham Hall in 1614 appears on the village sign. Caley Mill is the centre of lavender growing.

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Hingham
Small market town with a 14th century church, 15 miles from Norwich.

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Hunstanton
Seaside resort which faces the Wash. The shingle and sand beach is backed by striped cliffs, and many unusual fossils can be found here. The town is predominantly Victorian. The Oasis family leisure centre has indoor and outdoor pools.

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Kessingland
Seaside village whose church tower has served as a landmark to sailors for generations. Nearby is the Suffolk Wildlife and Country Park.

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King's Lynn
A busy town with many outstanding buildings. The Guildhall and Town Hall are both built of flint in a striking chequer design. Behind the Guildhall in the Old Gaol House the sounds and smells of prison life 2 centuries ago are recreated.

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Knapton
The church is visited for the beauty of its roof and font. The former, dated 1504, is 30 feet wide and adorned with a host of angels. The latter is 13th century, built of Purbeck marble, and has an interesting Decorative cover.

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Lavenham
A former prosperous wool town of timber-framed buildings with the cathedral-like church and its tall tower. The market-place is 13th century and the Guildhall now houses a museum.

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Long Melford
One of Suffolk's loveliest villages, remarkable for the length of its main street. Holy Trinity Church is considered to be the finest village church in England. The National Trust own the Elizabethan Melford Hall, and nearby Kentwell Hall is also open to the public.

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Lowestoft
Seaside town with wide sandy beaches. Important fishing port with picturesque fishing quarter. Home of the famous Lowestoft porcelain and birthplace of Benjamin Britten. East Point Pavilion's exhibition describes the Lowestoft story.

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Newmarket
Centre of the English horse-racing world and the headquarters of the Jockey Club and National Stud. Racecourse and horse sales. The National Horse Racing Museum traces the history and development of the Sport of Kings.

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Norwich
Beautiful cathedral city and county town on the River Wensum with many fine museums and medieval churches. Norman castle, Guildhall and interesting medieval streets. Good shopping centre and market.

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Orford
Once a thriving port, now a quiet village of brick and timber buildings, famous for its castle. Orford comes to life during the summer when boats tie up at the quay.

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Overstrand
Village with extensive sandy beach. The church of St Martin, built in 14th century but much rebuilt since, has a round tower and ancient oven for baking the sacrament.

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St. Albans
As Verulamium this was one of the largest towns in Roman Britain, and its remains can be seen in the museum. The Norman cathedral was built from Roman materials to commemorate Alban, the first British Christian martyr.

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Sandringham
Famous as the country retreat of Her Majesty the Queen. The house and grounds are open to the public at certain times.

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Saxmundham
The church of St John the Baptist has a hammer-beam roof and contains a number of good monuments.

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Sheringham
Holiday resort with Victorian and Edwardian hotels and a sand and shingle beach where the fishing boats are hauled up. The North Norfolk Railway operates from Sheringham station during the summer. Other attractions include museums, theatre and Splash Fun Pool.

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Snettisham
Village with a superb Decorated church. The 17th century Old Hall is a distinguished-looking house with Dutch gables over the 2 bays. Snettisham Pits is a reserve of the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds. Red deer herd and other animals, farm trails and nature walks at Park Farm.

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South Mimms
Best known today for its location at the junction of the M25 and the A1M.

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Southend-on-Sea
On the Thames Estuary and the nearest seaside resort to London. Famous for its pier and unique pier trains. Other attractions include Peter Pan's Playground, indoor swimming pools, indoor rollerskating and ten pin bowling.

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Southwold
Pleasant and attractive seaside town with a triangular market square and spacious greens around which stand flint, brick and colour-washed cottages. The parish church of St Edmund is one of the greatest churches in Suffolk.

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Sprowston
2 miles north of Norwich, 6 miles from the Broads.

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Stalham
Lies on the edge of the Broads.

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Stowmarket
Small market town where routes converge. There is an open-air museum of rural life at the Museum of East Anglian Life.

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Swanton Morely
All Saints Church, built around 1400, has an eye-catching west tower with large bell-openings at the top. The remains of a cottage belonging to the ancestors of Abraham Lincoln can also be seen.

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Thorpeness
A planned mock-Tudor seaside resort, built in the early 20th century, with a 65-acre artificial lake. The House in the Clouds was built to disguise a water-tower. The windmill contains an exhibition on Suffolk's Heritage Coast.

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Wells-Next-The-Sea
Seaside resort and small port on the north coast. The Buttlands is a large, tree-lined green surrounded by Georgian houses, and from here narrow streets lead to the quay.

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Woodbridge
Once a busy seaport, the town is now a sailing centre on the River Deben. There are many buildings of architectural merit including the Bell and Angel Inns. The 18th century Tide Mill is now restored and open to the public.

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Wroxham
Yachting centre on the River Bure which houses the headquarters of the Norfolk Broads Yacht Club. The church of St Mary has a famous doorway, and the manor house nearby dates back to 1623.

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